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latesthealthyremedies

Solutions to financing the health care

Other proposed solutions to financing the health care bill include a "sin" tax of 13 cents per 12-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage and 14 cents per bottle of beer or glass of wine (charging $98.55 annually for a person who consumes one soda and one glass of wine each day).

An alternative proposal is for individuals to pay taxes on the value of employee insurance benefits, which, on average, would be around $13,000 - the equivalent to most private health insurance. Another option involves lowering the insurance subsidy threshold would affect anyone making between $32,490 and $42,320 annually, because the government will not be able to financially subsidize those who make more than 300 percent than the poverty level.

On another note, how is it justifiable for those who choose not to participate in the government health insurance plan to still have to finance it?

Regardless of whose shoulders this payment will fall on, forcing people to do so is wrong. American rights are supposed to be irrevocable; citizens hold the right to be self-governed. So, why has the government become an all-powerful entity with the right to dictate the choices of its citizens? Why must Americans pay for health insurance, even against their wills? Surely, not all citizens are/will be sick or require medical attention. The only motivation and interest the government holds behind requiring universal health care is to fund its own agenda and expenses - which may prove timely, for example, now that China has begun questioning its future financing of American treasury bills.

The ultimate question that should weigh heavily on the minds of Congress as it finishes negotiating the health care bill is: should the American people put complete trust their government - and those funding it - to outfit the health insurance industry?
It is not the government's job to provide for its citizens; rather, it is the government's job to preserve opportunities for the Land of the

Free. Economic progress will halt once there is no longer any incentive to continue prospering. The wealthy should not be entitled to support the rest of America on their backs; people should not be bound by law to purchase health coverage; citizens should not have to turn to public health insurance instead of employing their preferred company; private insurance companies, who realistically cannot support themselves on the same budget as the government, should not be forced to declare bankruptcy at the hands of a monopolistic governmental program.

In a few years, all American citizens will have health insurance. A few years later, all American citizens will depend on public health care for insurance. Yet, the one component that will remain diverse is who pays the costs for the rest of the nation - of course, no health care coverage is free, but the overall price of the health care plan should be the same for all individuals. You would think that a socialist government would realize that.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl